A quick search for an Aconcagua gear list on the web returns a handful of unsatisfactory results that only go some of the way in providing a complete overview of the key gear requirements, but fall sadly short in terms of explaining why and what is needed on the mountain in detail.

We know that for serious trekkers and climbers the devil is in the detail, so we have set out what we consider to be the Ultimate Aconcagua Gear List. This list can be used as a reliable and complete resource for anyone looking to climb Aconcagua.

Please note that our gear list is always evolving and continuing to grow as more up to date products come to market. We also encourage trekkers and climbers to contact us after your visit to help us refine and add to the gear list.

When browsing this Aconcagua gear list we suggest using the table of contents provided to jump to key sections. We also recommend bookmarking this page in order to return to it easily as your preparations unfold.

If you know of any other trekkers or climbing thinking of climbing Aconcagua, please pass the list on.

Aconcagua Weather Variations

The weather on Aconcagua can be split into two dominant seasons. The winter season runs from April through to September, and the summer season from October through to March.

The peak season is of course during the warmer months as the altitude on Aconcagua makes upper reaches extremely cold, even in summer. The summer is also the wet season, however, rain is not so common in the region and you shouldn’t expect more than 5 or 6 days of rain a month in the wettest period. The mountain itself is particularly dry and dust can often be a problem. This is also the busiest time of the year.

Although temperatures are relatively consistent throughout the year at base camp, ranging from around 15 in winter to 30 degrees Celsius in summer, temperatures near the summit fluctuate considerably. Storms often hit the mountain and the summit temperature in summer can easily get down to -15 C.

The Aconcagua gear list below provides a perfect fit for climbers and trekkers planning to visit Aconcagua in the summer months. Remember, there are three sections to summiting Aconcagua – the trek in, the climb to high camp and the summit bid. All three sections require different clothing as we discuss below.

Clothing For The Trek In

The trek in to Base Camp at 13,000 feet takes three days. You pass through a number of valleys and it is here that the temperatures are highest, often reaching in excess of 30 degrees Celsius. Therefore, getting the right clothing is key.

SHIRTS

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Because it will be warm and you’ll be trekking in the sun you’ll need lightweight breathable shirts. You’ll probably want a minimum of two shirts, however, three wouldn’t hurt as you’ll also be trekking out. You may want to make one of your t-shirts long sleeve as some days may be cooler than others, especially in the late afternoon.

In terms of your trekking t-shirt, the shirt needs to be made of a high wicking fabric such as merino wool or polyester. In the summer months you will most likely sweat a fair amount on the trek in, you therefore want a shirt that allows the moisture to pass through. Please avoid just taking a standard cotton shirt as this will inhibit the moisture transfer. Fabrics like cotton don’t breathe anywhere near as well as the above mentioned fabrics and you’ll find you smell a lot more!

Icebreaker, Craghoppers and Columbia all make great trekking shirts that are affordable.

TROUSERS

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Like your shirts, your trousers should have the same high wicking qualities. Your legs are likely to sweat just as much which means that the right material will make a big difference.

We recommend purchasing trousers that can also be converted into shorts. These trousers offer you much more versatility and you’ll find they come in super handy in the hot parts of the day.

Craghoppers make fantastic convertible trousers that come in both male and female variations.

BREATHABLE UNDERWEAR

Just as the title says, basic sports underwear that breathes very well (i.e. not cotton).

You can either go for a specialist brand such as Icebreaker, or just get a cheaper non-brand alternative.

You will need 6-8 pairs for a 18 day trek.

SOFT SHELL LAYER

aconcagua-gear-list-shell-jacketIn addition to your fleece or hoody, you should also carry a water-resistant and wind-proof soft shell jacket.

The jacket should be very light, easily packable and durable. This is the jacket that needs to withstand any wind and rain you may encounter on your trek in.

We recommend the Patagonia Torrentshell Jacket or the Marmot Precip Jacket.

FLEECE OR HOODY

aconcagua-gear-list-fleeceHaving a fleece or hoody on the mountain  and on the trek in is key. Although the trek in will be hot during the day, the nights can get very cold, especially when sat around camp.

We recommend a hoody made from synthetic mid-weight Polartec fleece materials. These are perfect for warmth and comfort, but also provide excellent breathability. Polartec fleece jackets come in three main weights: 100s, 200s and 300s. The 100s are very light but not warm enough, whereas the 300s provide exceptional warmth but are a little on the heavy side. We therefore suggest going for a 200 Polartec fleece jacket.

Note worthy brands that make great fleeces include: North Face Fleece, Patagonia Fleece and Patagonia Fleece.

An extra great feature to look out for in a fleece is one that comes with a hoody as this can double as an instant balaclava. See the Patagonia R1 Hoody or the Arc’teryx Fortrez Hoody.

SUN HAT

aconcagua-gear-list-hatThe sun will be beating down upon your head on the trek in. You should therefore bring a lightweight, easy-to-pack sun hat to protect your head and face from getting sun burnt. This will also lessen the chance of getting sun stroke.

Try and get a sun hat with neck protection like the one shown adjacent.

Avoid bringing large bulky hats.

BUFF

In addition to a good sun hat we highly recommend bringing a few Buff headwear neck scarves. These are great for protecting your face and neck from the elements and keeping dust and particulates out of your lungs.

You can bring a lightweight version and a semi-fleeced version for higher up on the mountain.

HIGH ALTITUDE SUNGLASSES

UV intensity increases with altitude, therefore, you want a very good pair of trekking sunglasses to protect your eyes. Sunglasses are also very important on Aconcagua because of the snow. The light intensity created by the white snow can literally be blinding and normal sunglasses just wont cut it.

The undisputed market leader in high altitude sunglasses is Julbo Sunglasses.
aconcagua-gear-list-sunglasses-01All Julbo lenses offer 100% protection from UVA, B and C rays. Their category 4 lenses block up to 90% of visible light, making them ideal for Aconcagua. Whilst category 3 or lower is good for general use, you’ll need category 4 for Aconcagua.

The most versatile lens Julbo offer is the ‘Camel’. The Camel lens is essentially a transition lens and gets darker and lighter depending on the light intensity.  For Aconcagua we also recommend the Julbo Explorer range. These provide a secure fit that will see you through any climbing and snow activities.

Clothing For The Climb

Once you get to base camp at 13,000 feet, the serious climbing/trekking begins. You would have noticed on your trek in the temperature dropping and this continues to be the case as you make your way up the mountain.

For anyone who lives in a cold climate, the concept of layering should not be a new one. To keep warm in low temperatures, the idea is to build up layers of protective clothing that insulates the heat from your body. These layers need to be high wicking in order for moisture to pass from one layer to the next. This is an important point as each layer will not work as it should if the moisture cannot pass through. Therefore, any clothes you purchase for your journey need to be made of a high wicking fabric.

BASE LAYER (NEXT-TO-SKIN LAYER)

aconcagua-gear-list-bayerse-laWhen it gets cold you’ll want to start wearing a thermal base layer underneath your outer layers. The base layer hugs your skin and keeps your body heat within the layer. However, make sure it’s not too tight as this can restrict circulation. Make sure it is not too lose though as this will allow heat to escape.  Like all your layers, the base layer needs to be made from a high wicking material that is both lightweight and and breathable – Merino wool is the best for this.

Smartwool Lightweight Base Layers and Icebreaker Oasis Base Layers are both excellent makes. They provide both top and bottom base layers made from 100% merino wool. Their products are very comfortable, great quality and are incredibly high wicking.

For people who are allergic to wool then the Patagonia Capilene Lightweight Base Layers are excellent synthetic alternatives.

OUTER SHELL TROUSERS
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Warm trekking trousers are a must when climbing Aconcagua. It gets seriously cold in the snow and you’ll want to be wearing these over your lower base layer.

Make sure these pants are wind resistant, water resistant, sun protective and have a fleece inner material with a quick-drying polyester outer layer for extra warmth. The best option in terms of warmth and weather proofing is the Arc’teryx Kappa Pants.

CORE SHELL LAYER

The core shell layer is probably you most important piece of clothing. This jacket will keep you warm, waterproof and windproof in the cold conditions.

Choosing the right jackets can be very complicated as the material can vary significantly. However, most jackets can generally be split into two categories – down or synthetic. Whilst down jackets are usually more warm, they’re generally more heavy, expensive and not great in moist conditions. That being said, because of the freezing temperatures on Aconcagua, we would always recommend going for a down jacket!

Here are some key factors to consider when choosing your jacket:

  • Weight and warmth: The weight of a winter jackets can vary significantly. Some are as light as 200 grams whilst others can weigh up to 1kg or more.  Down provides the greatest ratio between warmth and weight and thus is perfect for Aconcagua. In terms of weight, the heavier the jacket is the warmer it tends to be. Whilst you might want to get the heaviest possible, remember that you will be carrying this around with you a lot of the time. We always suggest getting a top quality mid weight jacket, somewhere in the region of 600 grams.
  • Waterproofing: Whilst down is the warmest type of jacket, it does not fair as well as sythetic inwet conditions. A light shower would make no difference, but if it were to downpour, the down jacket may suffer. Therefore, it’s imperative to get a down jacket with a great water resistant outer layer. Pertex Shield fabric is the best we know of.
  • Versatility: Always look for pocket space, hood size, zip quality etc. before buying. The more versatile your jacket, the more activities you can do in it.

Here are some of our recommendations:
aconcagua-gear-list-jacket1. Outdoor Research Floodlight Jacket

This is a brilliant all round down jacket. It provides great warmth for it’s weight, probably the best waterproofing we’ve seen and great versatility.

Material: Down | Weight: 600 grams

An added bonus is this jacket is not on the expensive end of down jackets. Retails for around $350 / £250
aconcagua-gear-list-jacket-12. Mountain Hardwear Quasar Jacket

Worn by Ueli Steck, this jacket is both lightweight and warm. Although the design is minimalistic with few hand pockets, the jacket is still a great addition to any trek.

Material: Synthetic | Weight: 530 grams

Retails for a great price of around $200 / £120.

Other good jackets worth considering  include the North Face Nuptse, Mountain Hardwear Nilas (Down) and the Arc’teryx Atom LT Jacket.

INNER GLOVES

aconcagua-gear-list-inner-gloveKeeping your hands warm is super important. Frost bite is not uncommon on the mountain and you’ll want the best glove setup possible. In terms of inner gloves, you want a pair made from a high wicking fabric (synthetics, wool or even silk) are ideal. Do not go for a cotton as your hands will become very sweaty. Make sure the gloves have a good thermal lining and are lightweight for travel.

OUTER GLOVES

aconcagua-gear-list-glovesThe ideal outer gloves provides great warm whilst also being maneuverable, windproof and waterproof.

Remember, dexterity is hugely important as you’ll be using your hands more than you think.

Based on the criteria above we recommend the following gloves: Outdoor Research Southback Gloves, Black Diamond Guide Gloves or, for a very affordable but excellent outer glove, the Dakine Scout.

Clothing For The Summit Bid

The summit is extremely cold and windy. People often say the coldest they have ever been has been on the summit of Aconcagua. Temperatures plummet below freezing ans the wind can get in excess of 50 mph!

At this point you should be wearing all your layers, including, base layer, fleece, down jacket and a outer shell waterproof jacket. On top of this you will also need the following:

FLEECE BEANIE OR THERMAL BALACLAVA
Aconcagua-gear-list-balaclava

Aconcagua is one of the coldest summits in the world, often more cold than Everest. Therefore, a beanie or, probably better, a balaclava, will serve you well.

Make sure to buy a thermal balaclava.

The Trespass Moulder is a great balaclava option for climbers.

POLARTEC UNION SUIT
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This is optional but many climbers on Aconcagua swear by it. The suit is a thick one piece thermal base layer suit. If you struggle with the cold then this suit is a must! It will keep your body temperature up to 6 degrees C warmer than otherwise.

We highly recommend the NRS Men’s H2Core Expedition Weight Union Suit.

OUTER MITTENS
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Whilst your inner and outer layer gloves will protect you on most of the climb, you’ll want some heavy duty mittens for the summit. These will stop any heat escaping and keep your hands from getting too cold.

We recommend the Black Diamond Mercury Mitt or the Black Diamond Crew Mitt.

GORE-TEX BIBS
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Once again, these are optional, however, Alan Arnette believes these saved him from getting frost bite on Aconcagua. Gor-tex bibs go straight on over your trousers and are incredibly waterproof and windproof, making them ideal for keeping your legs warm.

Gore-tex make some great bibs including the Storm bib, the Kichatna Bib and the Front Point Bib.

Footwear

HIKING BOOTS
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Hiking boots are one of the most important pieces of kit in your Aconcagua gear list. Your feet need to be well supported and comfortable. It is critical that you bring a solid pair of boots that are not new – make sure they are worn in first (i.e. the inner sole should have begun to mold to your foot shape). Brand new boots will only bring pain and blisters!

The two key factors to look for in a boot are fit and quality.

A good way to test the fit is to wear a pair of trekking socks, push your foot as far as it will go forward and place an index finger down the back between your heel and boot. If the finger fits snugly this is a good sign. If it’s too tight or loose then you probably need to try another size.

For quality, the characteristics you need to look for are:

  • Medium high boots for good ankle support. Remember, the taller the boot the heavier it will be. Boots made from leather or a leather-condura material are generally recommended.
  • The sole should have a good rubber content and the lugs should be deep enough for grip but not too deep as this will increase weight.
  • Mid-weight boots are best for Aconcagua. You’ll most likely only be wearing them for certain parts of the trip, so the super heavy and durable ones will not be needed.
  • Make sure the boot is waterproof! Gore-tex or something similar will do.
  • The boots lacing-system should include speed hocks or D-strings which will provide extra ankle support

The Italian brand, Asolo, make exceptionally good hiking boots. Take a look at the Asolo Power Matic boot, or their Asolo Fugitive. For woman, the Asolo Stynger is great.

The Timberland Chocurua, Hi-Tec Altitude or any boot from Salomon are more affordable and still very good.

 WATER SHOES/SANDALS

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Depending on what route you take. you’ll most likely need to ford a few rivers on your trek in! No one wants to trek in wet boots, therefore, bringing along some lightweight water shoes or sandals is the best idea. These are very inexpensive and can fold down almost flat. Speedo water shoes do a good pair.

DOUBLE MOUNTAINEERING BOOTS

Aconcagua-gear-list-boreal

A lot of the climb will be covered in snow, therefore you’ll need proper winter mountain boots. These are particularly critical as you get higher. The snow deepens, the ice thickens and the weather gets well below freezing.

Mountain boots are quite specialist and you will need to try these on before buying. Make sure that the liners are replaceable and that the boots fit well. These types of boots are not cheap and you should expect to pay in the region of US$400 – $1,000 for a decent pair.

Great models include the Boreal G1 Lite, Millet Everest Summit, Scarpa Phantom and the Koflack Degre.

TREKKING SOCKS
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You should bring at least 5 pairs of trekking socks. Once again, these should be high wicking and light to medium weight. The best trekking socks are made from merino wool as they allow excellent breathability. Avoid cotton socks as these will absorb and retain the moisture which will enhance the likelihood of blistering. If  allergic to wool, go for a synthetic or acrylic blend sock.

Smartwool, Point 6 and Wigwam all make great trekking socks that meet the criteria. These socks all have flat seams which reduced irritation and provide great cushioning to the foot.

Climbing Packs

Getting a good pack is one of the most important considerations on your Aconcagua gear list. You’ll be carrying this yourself most of the time, so you’ll want to make sure you choose correctly.

Whilst porters are provided by many trekking companies on the mountain, most are used to help shift equipment. There is usually an option to pay for an extra porter to help carry your personal gear, this is not common though and most trekkers carry their own bags.

The four key considerations when choosing a pack are comfort, support, space and fit.

Comfort

If your pack is not comfortable you’re going to have a pretty rough trek. I like to always try carrying other trekkers bags at camp to get a feel of what bags suit me. Whilst this can be done in store, most bags are not crammed with gear which makes feeling for comfort difficult. Look for a bag that is well padded, including the pelvis strap. Good bags will have a large lower padded section that comes in contact with your back for lower comfort and support.

Support

Support is also key, particularly for people like myself who have back problems. You’ll want a good strong waist belt, thick shoulder pads and an even distribution. The best bags are super flexible, allowing them to contour to your back shape as you trek. Make sure your straps have multi-size adjustments fr versatility.

Space

Space is a big consideration. We generally advise at least 85 Liters for your journey, however, 105 liters is often the better option – although heavier. If you want to stay properly warm on the mountain you’re going to need a fair amount of gear space. Look for a bag that has a section for frequently needed items. This is often on the front of the bag or on the top. Also makes sure your bag has several spare lash points for extra items.

Fit

Getting the right fit is super important as you’ll develop back issues if you don’t. To get the right fit you need to know your torso length. This can be measured easily by taking a tape measure from your 7th vertebrae down (this is the knobbly one that stick out when you bend your neck downwards) and measuring down to the point on your back that is inline with your your hip bone. The measurement is your torso length. Make sure the lower straps of your bag wrap around your hips and not your lower waist or stomach! When fitted correctly most of the weight will be around your pelvis which frees up your upper body for movement.

Climbing Pack Recommendations

Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 OutDry Pack

The most comfortable large bag we have tried is without doubt the Mountain Hardwear BMG 105 OutDry Pack. This pack is incredibly light for its size and comes with all the benefits mentioned above. It’s constructed to last and has a durable outer shell membrane to protect your gar from the rain. Storage capacity, comfort and support is exceptionally high.

Osprey Aether 85L

Another smaller option is the Osprey Aether 85L for men and the Osprey Aether 85L for women. These are brilliant rucksacks that offer super support. Like the Hardwear, all the features mentioned above are included in this light and versatile pack. We’ve seen people on Everest expeditions using these!

A small duffel bag is ideal for taking added extras on your journey that you won’t actually take on the mountain. These can be left with your operator at the beginning of your climb. A small duffel bag can also be your carry-on-luggage for all your flights. A good size would be around 40 liters.

The North Face and Helly Hansen both do excellent duffel bags in a wide array of sizes.

Aconcagua Climbing Gear

Please note here that the climbing gear you need will very much depend on what route you take and if you choose to climb alone or with a team. Fixed ropes are needed on the more difficult routes, as are caribiners, belays, hexes, ice screws, harness etc. The items we have detailed below are needed for the two most popular and easy routes up Aconcagua – the Normal Route and the Polish Glacier Route.

ICE AXE

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Most mountaineering ice axes will do. Make sure you purchase one with an attachable leash. If you’re unsure of size, make sure you go with shorter rather than longer. The size chart according to height is – under 5’2” use a 50cm axe: 5’3” to 5’7” use a 55cm axe: 5’8” to 5’11” use a 60cm axe: 6’0” to 6’2” use a 65cm axe: above 6’3” use a 70cm axe. The Black Diamond Raven Pro is a great option.

CRAMPONS

aconcagua-gear-list-crampons

Very important near the summit. The ice and snow is thick near the summit and without crampons attached to your climbing boots you will slip. Crampons also make walking much easier and faster as your not constantly concerned about grip. We always recommend modern steel 12-point crampons that come with anti-balling plates. Try to avoid 10-point, aluminum, or single-piece ridgid crampons. We recommend the Black Diamond Sabertooth

CLIMBING HELMET

Aconcagua-gear-list-helmet

This is optional but we recommend it. Many people slip on Aconcagua, not just on the ice but also on the loose scree slopes. You’ll want a climbing specific helmet with enough space to attach a headlamp. Make sure there is enough space on the helmet to fit over a beanie/balaclava. The Black Diamond Vector helmet is our favourite.

TREKKING POLES

aconcagua-gear-list-polesYou’ll be trekking for at least 5 hours each day on Aconcagua over rocky and undulating ground, therefore, a good pair of trekking poles is very important. Although they may not look it, trekking poles massively reduce the strain on your leg joints. In fact, trekking poles have been proven to reduce up to 25% of the impact your legs take.

Black Diamond is the market leader in trekking poles. There are two models from their range we recommend. At the higher end is the Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork trekking poles. These are incredibly good. A cheaper alternative is the Black Diamond Ultra Distance which are also very good.

SNOW GOGGLES

aconcagua-gear-list-goggles

Although you’ll have your standard trekking sunglasses, you’ll also want some snow/ski goggles for the higher reaches, particularly if the weather sets in. When you’re near the summit and wearing your balaclava, these goggles will stop any wind hitting your eyes and stop the bright light from damaging your eyes.

The lens should have a visible light transmission (VLT) of no more than 30%. If you have sensitive eyes you may wish to go for darker. Photochromatic models are very good for use in changing light conditions. We recommend the Zeal Forecast goggles.

HEADLAMP

aconcagua-gear-list-headlamp

You will definitely need a headlamp. There is no electricity on the mountain and if you wish to leave your tent at night you’ll need a headlamp. You may also have some very early starts in which your guide will require you to wear a headlamp. Headlamps are always preferable to torches as they allow you to keep your hands free.

When choosing a headlamp, look for good brightness, long battery life and one that is not too heavy! A good beam should reach 70 meters in length.

The market leader in head torches is Petzl. We recommend getting the affordable, but still very good Petzl Tikka. At the top end is the Black Diamond Icon which gets 100 meter beam and 80 hours battery life!

Sleeping Bags

A warm sleeping bag is critical on Aconcagua as temperatures at night get well below freezing regardless of the season. Without the right sleeping bag, you’re going to be cold, uncomfortable and give up more easily. To help you decide we have laid out the key characteristics of a great sleeping bag below.

It is certainly possible to rent sleeping bags in Mendoza, however, we generally recommend to trekkers to bring your own. Rental sleeping bags are often not very hygienic and owning your own one will give you a little more piece of mind.

You generally do not need to worry about tents as these will be provided by your trek operator, but for those of you who love gear check out this great camping tent buying guide.

Down vs. Synthetic

Whether to get down or synthetic is a common question. Whilst down sleeping bags are generally warmer and more comfortable, they’re also more expensive. Therefore, you need to weigh up warmth against cost.

The cost consideration is very much dependent on your own personal budget. We always recommend to people who are planning on trekking or climbing regularly to purchase a down sleeping bag. If the climb is a one off then maybe buying synthetic is the right option.

If you’re planning on climbing Aconcagua you presumably like to trek and climb a fair bit. We therefore suggest going for a down, especially as it gets super cold on the higher reaches.

Warmth

Temperatures higher up the mountain reach in excess of -20 degrees Celsius, therefore, you need a sleeping bag that can keep you warm in these temperatures. We recommend your sleeping bag has a minimum rating of -30 degrees Celsius.

Remember, warmer is always better than colder!

Shape and Design

Mummy shaped sleeping bags are the best on the market. By fitting to the contours of your body they keep your body temperature higher.

Whilst there is a standard size for most adults, if you are particularly tall or short, be sure to check with the manufacturer before buying. You’ll want your sleeping bag to fit snugly, otherwise warmth will escape.

Also look out for a two way zipping system which improves insulation and also a hood of some sort – possibly draw string or similar.

Sleeping Bag Recommendations

SLEEPING BAG

RAB make a great winter sleeping bag. The Expedition 1000 is one of their best sleeping bags and we highly recommend it for Aconcagua. The bag is down and has a rating up to -30 degrees Celsius. It’s a very snug bag and often you’ll be too warm! Whilst RAB do do warmer ones such as the Expedition 1200 and 1400, these are considerably heavier and not needed unless you plan to scale the worlds tallest mountains.

SLEEPING MATT/PAD

Highly recommended as the landscape on Aconcagua is very rocky. We recommend either a standard sleeping matt or better still, a fully inflatable sleeping pad. Good ones are super light and fold down extremely small. We recommend the Thermarest NeoAir Xlite Sleeping Pad. This particular pad gives you 6cm of padding and folds down to the size of a standard waterbottle!

You may also wan to bring an inflatable pillow and sleeping bag liner,however, these are optional. Remember, the more things you bring – the more things you carry!

Water Bottles and Hydration Bladders

When trekking anywhere it is recommended that you drink at least 2 – 3 liters of purified water per day. On the trek in you’ll be sweating a lot and keeping up your fluids is critical. Keeping up fluids also helps keep up energy levels and starves off the symptoms of altitude sickness which is a real issue on Aconcagua.

Carrying 3 liters of water can be difficult, it is therefore recommended you try to drink at least 500ml before leaving camp each morning. If you take a water bottle and not a hydration bladder, you’ll probably want to take two and fill up the second during the day. When you reach camp it is also recommended that you drink another 500 ml of water.

WATER BOTTLES


aconcagua-gear-list-water
Camelbak Eddy Tritan Water Bottles are very good as they’re light (which is ideal for long distance climbs) and provide excellent insulation, although you will still need a bottle warmer on the higher reaches of the mountain.

Another option is the collapsible Platypus Water Bottle which is perfect for storage and carrying and has a volume capacity of 1L.

Make sure to also buy a water bottle parka to stop your water freezing near the summit.

HYDRATION BLADDERS

aconcagua-gear-list-bladder

Alternatively, hydration bladders are another option. Hydration bladders sit inside your climbing pack with a tube that runs over your shoulder and sits next to your mouth. These have become extremely popular as you have a constant feed of water. Hydration bladders are also bigger and can come in 2L AND 3L sizes. They can also be squashed down for ease of carrying.

We recommend the Geigerrig Hydration Engine(3L). This bladder is the only fully pressurised system available and makes it easier to drink from than other bladders.

For a more affordable option we recommend the Platypus Big Zip (3L) and the MSR Dromlite.

Aconcagua Gear List Accessories

COLLAPSIBLE BOWL AND MUG

Optional depending on your trekking company. One two cup capacity packable bowl will be needed for food, soup and snacks (bring one spoon). Collapsible versions are ideal as they occupy less space in the pack. Lids are not needed. Most trekkers will bring 1 collapsible mug also for hot drinks.

PEE BOTTLE/FUNNEL

Because it is so cold near the summit, you won’t wan to leave your tent at night to go to the toilet. Men will therefore need a 1 pee bottle (1L) and woman will need 1 pee funnel. We recommend woman practise before leaving!

WATER PURIFICATION TABLETS

Water on and near the mountain will not be purified. You’ll wan to bring tablets or water purifier drops. We recommend AquaMira.

CAMERA/VIDEO CAMERA

You’ll want to catch every great moment along your climb. Make sure your camera is small and compact, has a good battery life and takes HD pictures/videos.  We always recommend the Go Pro – fantastic quality in a small size. Remember to bring spare batteries!

TOILETRIES

You’ll  need all your basic toiletries including toothbrush, toothpaste, hand sanitizer and toilet paper. Bring a small bag dry bag to store these in.

SUNSCREEN AND LIPSCREEN

It often gets very hot on the trek in and you’ll want some 30+ factor sunscreen. Buy a small tube. On the upper reaches you’ll also need some lipscreen as your lips will dry and blister in the cold snow conditions otherwise.

PERSONAL FIRST AID KIT

Although your guide will no doubt have one, it’s always better to be safe than sorry. If you are climbing alone then you will definitely need one of these.

MEDICATIONS

Bring Pepto Bismol, Imodium, Diamox and a variety of standard over-the-counter painkillers. If you have any personal prescriptions then bring these as well. You may also want to bring some blister plasters and tape.

BABY WIPES

Perfect for cleaning yourself after a sweaty day climbing or trekking. Your guides will probably provide you with a water bowl and towel, however, baby wipes are actually easier to use.

HAND AND TOE WARMERS

It’s seriously cold near the top. If you feel the cold then definitely bring 3 sets of each. Toe Warmers are different to hand warmers in that they are formulated to work in lower levels of oxygen, such as the inside of a boot. Toe warmers will also not last as long.

SNACKS AND ENERGY BARS

You’ll be climbing a long way each day for a considerable amount of time. Keeping up your energy and strength is vital. We always recommend taking a few snacks and energy bars each day to keep you going.

EAR PLUGS

You’ll be sharing a tent with another person and if you are a light sleeper or struggle to sleep with unfamiliar noises, then bringing some ear plugs is a good idea. On top of this, porters will be up earlier than you as a general rule and may wake you if you are a light sleeper.

ZIP LOCK BAGS

Your pack will be exposed to the elements during your climb on Aconcagua. Exposure to dust is very common. To protect your valuables such as your wallet and camera, we recommend taking a couple of zip lock bags.

BOOK / KINDLE

Last but not least is a book or Kindle! Entertainment on the mountain is fairly light and you may want a book to get you through those long evenings. We recommend the Kindle Paperwhite.

Other Packing Lists

Everest Base Camp Packing List

Click here for a full and detailed Everest Base Camp Packing List. Everything from sleeping bags and hiking boots, to rucksacks and jackets.

Annapurna Circuit Packing List

Click here for the complete Annapurna Circuit Packing List. You’ll find all the gear you need listed along with our personal recommendation for each item.

Multi-Day Trek Packing List

Click here for a complete multi-day trek packing list. We have included everything you’ll need to for any trekking destination in the world.

FAQ

If you have any further questions or queries regarding any of the items mentioned in this Aconcagua gear list, please just drop us a note below and we’ll respond as soon as possible.

Thank you and happy climbing!

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